Blog

 Industry Partners


Prairie Swine Centre is an affiliate of the University of Saskatchewan


Prairie Swine Centre is grateful for the assistance of the George Morris Centre in developing the economics portion of Pork Insight.

Financial support for the Enterprise Model Project and Pork Insight has been provided by:



Feeding and barn management practices that improve feed efficiency

Posted in: Pork Insight Articles, Production by katrina on March 30, 2012

This presentation by Dr. Goodband of Kansas State University was presented at the 2nd in a series of 8 webinars on Feed Efficiency hosted by Prairie Swine Centre.  To access the presentation scroll down and click on Download PDF

Effect of crude glycerol combined with solvent-extracted or expeller-pressed canola meal on growth performance and diet nutrient digestibility of weaned pigs

Posted in: Pork Insight Articles, Production, Swine Innovation by katrina on March 15, 2012

Partially substituting soybean meal and wheat with canola co-products was evaluated using 240 weaned pigs [6.3 kg initial body weight (BW)]. Pigs were fed for 4 week pelleted diets containing 150 g/kg of solvent-extracted or expeller-pressed canola meal either with 0 or 50 g/kg crude glycerol or a soybean meal control diet to measure performance and diet nutrient digestibility. The wheat-based diets were formulated to contain 9.45 MJ/kg net energy (NE) and 1.13 g standardised ileal digestible (SID) lysine (Lys)/MJ NE. Glycerol increased (P<0.05) diet digestible energy content by 0.6 and 0.2 MJ/kg of dry matter for solvent-extracted and expeller-pressed canola meal diets, respectively. Canola co-product diets had a lower (P<0.05) nutrient digestibility than the control diet, while DE content did not differ. For days 0–28, BW gain and feed efficiency did not differ between the types of canola meal, the two levels of glycerol, and the canola co-product diets and control diet, although feed intake was 6% higher (P<0.05) for the control than canola co-product diets. In conclusion, 150 g/kg of solvent-extracted or expeller-pressed canola meal or with 50 g/kg glycerol can partially replace soybean meal and wheat in diets formulated to equal NE and SID amino acid content fed to weaned pigs without affecting growth performance.

© 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

The effect of feeding expeller-pressed canola meal on growth performance and diet nutrient digestibility in weaned pigs

Posted in: Pork Insight Articles, Production, Swine Innovation by katrina on

The effects of feeding increasing levels of expeller-pressed (EP) canola meal in substitution for soybean meal as an energy and amino acid source were evaluated in 240 weaned pigs with an initial body weight of 7.3 ± 0.6 kg. Five pelleted wheat-based diets containing 0, 50, 100, 150 or 200 g EP canola meal/kg were formulated to contain 10.0 MJ net energy (NE)/kg and 1.18 g standardised ileal digestible (SID) lysine/MJ NE and were fed for 4 wk starting 1 wk after weaning at 19 days of age. Expeller-pressed canola meal was added at the expense of soybean meal and the diets were balanced for NE using canola oil and for amino acids using crystalline lysine, methionine, threonine and tryptophan. Increasing inclusion of EP canola meal linearly reduced (P<0.001) the apparent total tract digestibility of energy, dry matter and crude protein and the digestible energy content of diets. From 0 to 28 days on trial, increasing inclusion of EP canola meal did not affect body weight gain, feed intake and feed efficiency. In conclusion, up to 200 g EP canola meal/kg can replace soybean meal in diets formulated to equal NE and SID amino acid content and fed to nursery pigs starting 1 wk after weaning without reducing growth performance.

© 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

The effect of feeding solvent-extracted canola meal on growth performance and diet nutrient digestibility in weaned pigs

Posted in: Pork Insight Articles, Production, Swine Innovation by katrina on

The effects of feeding increasing levels of solvent-extracted canola meal in substitution for soybean meal as an energy and amino acid source were evaluated in 220 weaned pigs with an initial body weight of 8.1 ± 1.8 kg. Five pelleted wheat-based diets containing 0, 50, 100, 150 or 200 g canola meal/kg were formulated to contain 9.74 MJ net energy (NE)/kg and 1.21 g standardised ileal digestible (SID) lysine/MJ NE and were fed for 4 wk starting 1 wk after weaning at 19 days of age. Canola meal was added at the expense of soybean meal and the diets were balanced for NE using canola oil and for amino acids using crystalline lysine, threonine and tryptophan. Increasing inclusion of canola meal reduced linearly (P<0.05) the apparent total tract digestibility of energy, dry matter and crude protein and quadratically(P<0.05) the digestible energy content of diets. From 0 to 28 days on trial, increasing inclusion of canola meal did not affect body weight gain, feed intake and feed efficiency. In conclusion, up to 200 g solvent-extracted canola meal/kg can replace soybean meal in diets formulated to equal NE and SID amino acid content and fed to weaned pigs without detrimental effects on growth performance.

© 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Chemical characteristics, feed processing quality, growth performance and energy digestibility among wheat classes in pelleted diets fed to weaned pigs

Posted in: Pork Insight Articles, Production, Swine Innovation by katrina on

Among wheat classes based on end use, the nutritional quality of wheat for pigs is expected to vary. Therefore, Canada Prairie Spring Red (CPSR), Canada Prairie Spring White (CPSW), Canada Western Amber Durum (CWAD), Canada Western Hard White Spring (CWHWS) and Canada Western Red Winter (CWRW) wheat are separated out from Canada Western Red Spring (CWRS) wheat, which is the standard wheat for bread also known as hard red spring wheat. Two cultivars from these six wheat classes were characterised for their physicochemical, feed milling properties and nutritional value for young, growing pigs. Growth and energy digestibility were studied for 3 wk with weaned pigs (12.8 ± 1.2 kg initial body weight) fed diets containing 650 g/kg wheat [14.6 MJ digestible energy (DE)/kg; 14.2 g digestible lysine/MJ DE]. Wheat crude protein (on dry matter basis) ranged from 124 to 174 g/kg among classes: 127–165 g for CPSW and CPSR, and 165–170 g/kg for CWAD. Total non-starch polysaccharides ranged from 90 to 115 g/kg among classes. For days 0–21, average daily gain, average daily feed intake and feed efficiency did not differ among wheat cultivars and classes (P>0.05). The coefficient of apparent total tract digestibility of energy in the diet was lowest (P<0.05) for CPSR (0.87), intermediate for CPSW, CWRS, CWHWS (0.87–0.88) and highest for CWAD and CWRW (0.89). Feed pelleting speed and pellet durability did not differ (P>0.05) among wheat diets but pelleting increased viscosity of diets (P<0.001). Principle component analysis revealed the negative impact of fibre components on feed efficiency. In conclusion, despite variations in chemical characteristics and DE content among wheat classes, young pigs fed all classes of wheat including CPSW, CPSR and CWAD may perform effectively.

© 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

The effect of feeding wheat distillers dried grain with solubles on growth performance and nutrient digestibility in weaned pigs

Posted in: Pork Insight Articles, Production, Swine Innovation by katrina on

The effects of substituting soybean meal with wheat distillers dried grain with solubles (DDGS) as an energy and amino acid source on growth performance and dietary nutrient digestibility were evaluated in 240 weaned pigs with an initial body weight (BW) of 6.2 ± 1.2 kg. Five pelleted wheat-based diets containing 0, 50, 100, 150, or 200 g wheat DDGS/kg were formulated to contain 10.0 MJ/kg net energy (NE) and 1.15 g standardised ileal digestible (SID) lysine (Lys)/MJ NE and were fed for 4 wk. For d 0–28, increasing dietary inclusion of wheat DDGS quadratically reducedBWgain (P<0.001) mainly due to a quadratically reduced (P<0.001) feed intake but also a reduced (P<0.001) feed efficiency. At d 28, pigs fed 50, 100, 150 and 200 g wheat DDGS/kg were 0.1, 0.1, 0.4 and 5.5 kg lighter (P<0.001) than pigs fed 0 g wheat DDGS/kg. In conclusion, weaned pigs fed diets formulated to equal NE and SID amino acids can be fed up to 100 g wheat DDGS/kg without reducing final body weight (BW) and up to 150 g wheat DDGS/kg with limited reductions in growth performance. Despite similar DE content among diets, inclusion of 200 g wheat DDGS/kg of drastically reduced growth performance of weaned pigs.

© 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

 

 

Tryptophan requirement of young, growing sows during pregnancy – ABSTRACT

Posted in: Pork Insight Articles, Swine Innovation by katrina on February 16, 2012

Accelerated conceptus growth in the last trimester may increase amino acid and energy requirements of pregnant sows. The objective of this study was to determine the Tryptophan (Trp) requirement in early (EG, d 35 to 53) and late (LG, d 92 to 111) gestation using the indicator amino acid oxidation (IAAO) method. It was found that the The Trp requirement was greater by 52% in LG (2.6 g/d) compared to EG (1.7 g/d). The increase in Phe retention from EG (2.94 g/d) to LG (8.28 g/d) agreed with a gain of 1 g/d N per fetus in LG and indicated that maternal protein gain was similar in EG and LG. Heat production was greater by 3% in LG compared to EG. Lipid retention decreased from EG to below zero in LG. Young sows strive to maintain fetal and maternal protein growth even if lipid retention becomes negative. This shows the importance of meeting amino acid requirements in late pregnancy.

Tryptophan requirement of gestating sows – ABSTRACT

Posted in: Pork Insight Articles, Swine Innovation by katrina on

Amino acid requirements of sows may change from early (EG) to late (LG) gestation due to the accelerated growth of products of conceptus after d 70 of pregnancy. The objective of this study was to determine the Tryptophan requirement in EG (d 35 to 53) and LG (92 to 111) using the indicator amino acid oxidation method.  It was found that heat production and energy retention were not affected (P = 0.92) by Trp intake but increased and decreased, respectively from EG to LG. The changes in Trp requirement and energy retention during gestation cannot be adequately met by increasing the feed allowance of a single diet throughout pregnancy. Therefore, phase feeding of 2 diets with different Trp contents is necessary to balance Trp and energy intake with the changing Trp and energy requirements in pregnancy.

Tryptophan requirement of pregnant sows – ABSTRACT

Posted in: Pork Insight Articles, Swine Innovation by katrina on

Amino acid (AA) requirements of sows may change from early (EG) to late (LG) gestation due to the accelerated growth of products of conceptus after d 70 of pregnancy. Because Tryptophan (Trp) is a co-limiting AA in corn-soy diets, this study was conducted to determine the Trp requirement in EG and LG using the indicator AA oxidation method.  It was found that the changes in Trp requirement and energy retention during gestation cannot be adequately met by increasing the feed allowance of a single diet throughout pregnancy. Therefore, phase feeding of 2 diets with different Trp contents is necessary to balance Trp and energy intake with the changing Trp and energy requirements in pregnancy.

Phase Feeding for Pregnant Sows – Powerpoint presentation

Posted in: Pork Insight Articles, Swine Innovation by katrina on

This PowerPoint presentation includes descriptions on the current status of sow feeding, amino acide requirements and availability, energy requirements and energy use, feeding recommendations.

 
Slots Master There is no definite strategy or technique that you can use as you play slots