Pork Insight Articles

 Industry Partners


Prairie Swine Centre is an affiliate of the University of Saskatchewan


Prairie Swine Centre is grateful for the assistance of the George Morris Centre in developing the economics portion of Pork Insight.

Financial support for the Enterprise Model Project and Pork Insight has been provided by:



From Innovation to Adoption: RESULTS

Posted in: Pork Insight Articles, Prairie Swine Centre, Swine Innovation by admin on November 23, 2017 | No Comments

Activity 5.  From Innovation to Adoption: RESULTS

For Your Barn

Water Intake Checklist Feeder Design Considerations  6 S’s of Successful Enrichment

eNEWS

Water Wastage and Usage from Nipple Drinkers

Chief Executive Officer – Advertisement

Posted in: Pork Insight Articles, Prairie Swine Centre, Press Releases by admin on November 13, 2017 | No Comments

Chief Executive Officer

Prairie Swine Centre Inc. (PSC) is a unique research, knowledge transfer and training company focused on the Canadian pork industry with an operating budget approaching $4 million annually. This not-for-profit corporation has been delivering world-class expertise in support of applied production research for 25 years. The PSC farm, facilities, and offices are located near Floral, SK (approx. 10 km east of Saskatoon) and is affiliated with the University of Saskatchewan. A Chief Executive Officer (CEO) is required to lead the organization of 30+ employees with a continued focus on stakeholder knowledge transfer, applied research, pork production, and the development of highly qualified people.

As the CEO, you report to the Board of Directors and collaborate with the Board to develop and implement the vision and strategic plan for the organization. You are a dynamic and creative strategic thinker, capable of understanding and aligning the goals of stakeholders within PSC and developing proactive and innovative strategies to strengthen services, build business, and move PSC forward as a world-class knowledge development and transfer company.

View the full job description at our careers page.

Successfully Converting to Group Sow Housing

Posted in: Pork Insight Articles, Prairie Swine Centre, Swine Innovation by admin on November 7, 2017 | No Comments

Demonstrating Management Practices that Enhance the Sustainability of Pork Production
Activity 1.1 – Successfully Converting to Gestating Sow Group Housing

In September 2017 two group sow housing seminars were held in Winnipeg, Manitoba and Strathmore, Alberta.  The goal of these meetings was to better inform those producers who are currently looking to make the conversion to group sow housing.  The meetings brought together a combination of speakers that addressed the areas of renovation, producer experience, technology & innovation, types of renovations and nutrition.  The agenda for the meetings can be found below, in addition to copies of the PowerPoint presentations and video presentations.

 

 
 

In the Media

Effective Strategies for Reducing Aggression Among Group Housed Sows  (view article)
Advance Planning and Training Key to Grouping Sows  (view article)
New or Renovate Hog Barns (view article)
One Producer’s Experience in Switching to Sow Group Housing (view article)
Hog Barn Codes – To Renovate or to Build New is the Big Question (view article)
Pas de retour en arrière pour les truies en groupe (French) (view article)

FarmScape Interviews 

Deciding to Build New or Renovate Comes Down to Cost
Murray Elliott – FGC Construction [ Monday 25 Sep, 2017]

Cost Key When Deciding Whether to Renovate or Build from Scratch
Murray Elliott – FGC Construction [ Tuesday 22 Aug, 2017]

Partial Renovation Popular In Converting to Group Sow Housing
Murray Elliott – FGC Construction [ Wednesday 16 Aug, 2017]

Non-Competitive Feeding Allows Greater Range of Weight and Larger Group Size
Jennifer Brown – Prairie Swine Centre [ Thursday 05 Oct, 2017]

Researchers Identify Strategies For Reducing Aggression Among Group Housed Sows
Jennifer Brown- Prairie Swine Centre [ Thursday 21 Sep, 2017]

Adoption of Group Housing Varies by Region
Jennifer Brown – Prairie Swine Centre [ Tuesday 05 Sep, 2017]

Access to Research Improves Decision Making When Moving to Group Sow Housing
Jennifer Brown – Prairie Swine Centre [ Thursday 24 Aug, 2017]

Group Sow Housing Offers Opportunity to Reduce Energy Costs
Hyatt Frobose – Gestal [ Friday 13 Oct, 2017]

Right Diets and Right Volumes Critical to Peak Sow Productivity
Hyatt Frobose- Gestal [ Monday 02 Oct, 2017]

Nutrition Key to Improved Reproductive Performance and Longevity of Sows
Hyatt Frobose – Gestal [ Wednesday 06 Sep, 2017]

Pork Producers Encouraged to Formulate Sow Rations Based on Parity
Hyatt Frobose – Gestal [ Thursday 31 Aug, 2017]

Modern Communication Technology Aids in Monitoring Swine Herd Performance
John Van Engelen – Hog-Tied Farms [ Wednesday 27 Sep, 2017]

Adoption of Technology Helps Improve Productivity
John Van Engelen – Hog-Tied Farms [ Wednesday 13 Sep, 2017]

 

 

 

Demonstrating Management Practices that Enhance the Sustainability of Pork Production

Posted in: Pork Insight Articles, Prairie Swine Centre, Swine Innovation by admin on | No Comments

Demonstrating Management Practices that Enhance the Sustainability of Pork Production
Activity 1.1 – Successfully Converting to Gestating Sow Group Housing

Successfully Converting to Group Sow Housing
 
 

 FarmScape Interviews 

Deciding to Build New or Renovate Comes Down to Cost
Murray Elliott – FGC Construction [ Monday 25 Sep, 2017]

Cost Key When Deciding Whether to Renovate or Build from Scratch
Murray Elliott – FGC Construction [ Tuesday 22 Aug, 2017]

Partial Renovation Popular In Converting to Group Sow Housing
Murray Elliott – FGC Construction [ Wednesday 16 Aug, 2017]

Non-Competitive Feeding Allows Greater Range of Weight and Larger Group Size
Jennifer Brown – Prairie Swine Centre [ Thursday 05 Oct, 2017]

Researchers Identify Strategies For Reducing Aggression Among Group Housed Sows
Jennifer Brown- Prairie Swine Centre [ Thursday 21 Sep, 2017]

Adoption of Group Housing Varies by Region
Jennifer Brown – Prairie Swine Centre [ Tuesday 05 Sep, 2017]

Access to Research Improves Decision Making When Moving to Group Sow Housing
Jennifer Brown – Prairie Swine Centre [ Thursday 24 Aug, 2017]

Group Sow Housing Offers Opportunity to Reduce Energy Costs
Hyatt Frobose – Gestal [ Friday 13 Oct, 2017]

Right Diets and Right Volumes Critical to Peak Sow Productivity
Hyatt Frobose- Gestal [ Monday 02 Oct, 2017]

Nutrition Key to Improved Reproductive Performance and Longevity of Sows
Hyatt Frobose – Gestal [ Wednesday 06 Sep, 2017]

Pork Producers Encouraged to Formulate Sow Rations Based on Parity
Hyatt Frobose – Gestal [ Thursday 31 Aug, 2017]

Modern Communication Technology Aids in Monitoring Swine Herd Performance
John Van Engelen – Hog-Tied Farms [ Wednesday 27 Sep, 2017]

Adoption of Technology Helps Improve Productivity
John Van Engelen – Hog-Tied Farms [ Wednesday 13 Sep, 2017]

 

 

 

Innovation to Adoption: On Farm Demonstration of Swine Research

Posted in: Pork Insight Articles, Prairie Swine Centre, Swine Innovation by admin on | No Comments

From Innovation to Adoption: On-Farm Demonstration of Swine Research is an integrated collaborative project involving Swine Innovation Porc, Centre de développement du porc du Québec and Prairie Swine Centre.  This project will help the 7,000 pork producers across Canada seize new opportunities and incorporate novel technologies and strategies in their production systems. Specifically, this project involves three primary components:

  1. Partner with commercial pork producers/organizations to serve as Lead-Users (demonstration sites) for the new technology or management practice;
  2. Communicate results and information gathered through the demonstration sites to others within the Canadian pork industry increasing the adoption of new technologies and management practices throughout Canada.
  3. Develop tools to increase the speed of adoption of new technologies and strategies on pig farms

 

ACTIVITY 1.  Demonstrating Management Practices that Enhance the Sustainability of Pork Production

Objective:  Identify efficiencies in transitioning gestation sows from stalls to group housing systems through early adopters and science.

1.1 Successfully Converting to Gestating Sow Group Housing
1.2 Environmental Enrichment Strategies & Improved Laying Areas for Sows
1.3 Reducing Water Consumption in Swine Barns

 

ACTIVITY 2.  Demonstrating New Nutritional Strategies – Low Cost Feeding Strategies for Sows

Objective: Demonstrate low cost feeding strategies for optimum sow productivity

2.1 Low Cost Feeding Strategies for Sows

 

ACTIVITY 3.  Auditing On-Farm Best Management Practices

Objective: Measure the pork industry’s adoption of best management practices that reduce cost of production, enhance sustainability and reduce labour commitments.

 

ACTIVITY 4.  Swine Health Management an Biosecurity – Rapid Assessment of Transport Trailer Cleanliness

Objective: Demonstrate the use of ATP bioluminescence meter for rapid assessment of surface cleanliness of swine transport trailers.

 

ACTIVITY 5.  Communications

Objective: Increase the speed of technology of adoption of Lead-User activities by communicating demonstration results to the Canadian pork industry.

 

 

This project ‘From Innovation to Adoption: On-Farm Demonstration of Swine Research’ is funded by Swine Innovation Porc within the Swine Cluster 2: Driving Results Through Innovation research program. Funding is provided by Agriculture and Agri‐Food Canada through the AgriInnovation Program, provincial producer organizations and industry partners.

 

 

 

 

 

 

EUTHANASIA – CODE OF PRACTICE FOR THE CARE AND HANDLING OF PIGS

Posted in: Prairie Swine Centre, Swine Innovation, Welfare by admin on October 26, 2017 | No Comments

The following is a list of acceptable and unacceptable methods of euthanasia of individual animals for
use on-farm, as well as methods that are only considered acceptable with the noted conditions. The
chart is based on the information that was available at the time of publishing1. For any method to be
considered acceptable, it must render the animal immediately insensible and the animal must not return
to sensibility prior to death. Individuals who euthanize pigs must be trained in the appropriate methods.

Methods of Euthanasia

Identification, treatment and prevention of shoulder lesions in sows

Posted in: Pork Insight Articles, Prairie Swine Centre by PSCI on October 24, 2017 | No Comments

Shoulder lesions are most commonly observed in sows during the weeks following farrowing. Long periods of lying combined with poor body condition can increase the likelihood of sows developing shoulder sores. The prevalence of shoulder lesions varies greatly depending on farm and sow factors, with anywhere from 10 to 50% of sows being affected. Shoulder lesions, also referred to as shoulder sores or ulcers, typically appear as a circular sore on the upper shoulder.

In sows, shoulder lesions appear over the scapula, where the amount of soft tissue between the skin and bone is insufficient to distribute external pressure. Lying laterally (such as during nursing bouts) puts pressure on this area, and prolonged lying can restrict blood flow and result in localized tissue damage. Shoulder lesions in sows are comparable with pressure ulcers in humans, also known as bed sores. Once they have developed they are difficult to treat, and will often return during the next lactation. In practical terms this means sows are at their highest risk for developing lesions in the weeks after farrowing as they can spend over 90% of their time lying during this period.

The first indication of a shoulder lesion forming is reddening of the skin. The skin may become damp and flies can be attracted to the area. If the problem goes untreated, the sore can quickly progress to an open ulcer, and in extreme cases, the underlying bone may be exposed.  The occurrence and severity of shoulder lesions varies greatly from farm-to-farm, reflecting the multifactorial nature of this problem.

Shoulder Lesions – Brown

Investigating ventilation system requirements for a sow gestation barn converted to group housing

Posted in: Pork Insight Articles, Prairie Swine Centre by PSCI on October 2, 2017 | No Comments

Computer simulation was utilized to assess the performance of different ventilation system configurations needed for a sow gestation barn newly-converted to group housing. Various configurations of the ventilation system involving varying capacities and locations of exhaust fans as well as size, design and location of air inlets, were examined based on indoor air quality (i.e., air temperature, humidity, and air speed at the animal level) and ventilation effectiveness (i.e., air distribution and airflow pattern, inlet air velocity, and room static pressure). Based on the computer simulation results, horizontal flow ventilation system with air inlets on one side and exhaust fans on the opposite side showed the best simulated performance among all ventilation design configurations tested. The horizontal flow ventilation configuration was then selected for further evaluation in an actual group sow housing facility, where energy use, temperature and air quality, and sow welfare and performance were assessed.

Ventilation Systems – ARR 2017

Protecting What You Have

Posted in: Pork Insight Articles, Prairie Swine Centre, Press Releases by PSCI on September 15, 2017 | No Comments

The reminders of the spread of PEDv across Manitoba the past 5 months remind us just how fragile our systems can be to external challenges. Current market prices and forward contracts have given us a well needed breather as an industry to rebuild/refurbish our farms and fix balance sheets. Is that current financial success holding us back?

What I mean – Are we taking threats seriously enough to actually change practices to protect our farms? This article is primarily health focused because we have had the opportunity to travel to many farms, conferences, open houses etc. the past 6 months and there is a disturbing complacency toward health threats emerging in our attitudes and practices in spite of the real threat PEDv represents. If you are reading this in southern Manitoba you are probably thinking that health is all we have thought about for months and yes we have changed and reviewed practices and everyone is on ‘high alert’. My concern is that outside of Manitoba we are not taking the same heightened awareness.

Two specific incidents come to mind. A packing plant tour is an excellent way to stay informed of how our product is transformed into food, this is particularly important for the students and staff at Prairie Swine Centre to help understand the larger industry. In 2014, several months after PEDv began wreaking havoc in the US, I was on a similar tour and everyone arrived with cleaned vehicles and were putting on plastic boot covers before they stepped out of their vehicle – in 2017 it was back to business as usual, farm vehicles in various states of cleanliness and not one pair of plastic boot covers to be seen. A second example was at a swine industry tradeshow, tractor trailers and goosenecks parked in the lot beside the passenger vehicles. It was not difficult to tell these trailers were swept out but not washed nor baked.

These two examples speak to my concern that we just aren’t using all the knowledge available to us to protect our farms.

At the same time I see headlines that tell us health challenges are all around us. Internationally Uruguay has identified PRRS for the first time in widely separated areas. The country undergoes regular testing so what happened? Closer to home, a PRRS virus variant previously associated with Minnesota is now in western Canada. Homegrown problems with Strep Suis seem to be on the rise. The Canada-West Swine Health Intelligence Network noted laboratories reporting an increase in positive cultures. Our own experience is that hot temperatures and extra movement and handling triggered a couple weeks of sudden losses that are not typical for this herd.

Our industry has enjoyed phenomenal growth in productivity and generally improving health status for several years. We know all too well that we cannot rely on continued access to antibiotics, and now additional scrutiny on zinc and previously copper in the EU promises to spill over and take yet one more tool from the troubleshooting toolbox. One editorial suggested 2.50 Euro per pig in reduced earning if Zinc Oxide became unavailable. These factors are all the more reason to keep the biosecurity high.
The following is sourced from the Canada-West Swine Health Intelligence Network Report July 31 regarding heightened biosecurity measures that should be considered as you review your biosecurity plan.

  • Managing Transport –wash and bake trucks
  • Managing any supplies, including feed ingredients and breeding stock coming from infected areas
  • Compost deadstock (to reduce rendering traffic to your farm)
  • Follow strict contractor protocols
  • Participate in the environmental testing programs

Our Centre is undergoing another internal biosecurity audit. We do this about every 18 months to 2 years, rotating between internal and external audits. Every time we find something. This is time well spent to protect what we have.

 
Slots Master There is no definite strategy or technique that you can use as you play slots